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For many adults, social media plays a role in the way they navigate and share information about their romantic relationships. Moreover, social media has become a place where some users discuss relationships and investigate old ones. But social media can also be a source of annoyance and conflict for some couples.

Still, some users view these platforms as an important venue for showing love and affection. These are some of the main findings from a nationally representative survey of 4, U. This reference guide explains each term. Women who are in a relationship are more likely than men to say their partner is often distracted by their phone while they are trying to hold a conversation, but this gender difference is most pronounced among younger adults.

Americans — regardless of whether they are in a relationship — were asked in the survey about their views about some issues related to technology and relationships. Seven-in-ten U. Majorities across major demographic groups view these actions as unacceptable, but there are some Americans who are more accepting of this behavior than others. These actions also vary by the type of relationship.

However, this pattern is largely due age differences in relationship status, as twice as many adults under 50 live with a partner than do those 50 and older. There also are some differences by race and ethnicity. Overall, sharing passwords to digital devices or accounts is a fairly common practice in romantic relationships.

Married or cohabiting adults are much more likely to share their cellphone or social media passwords with their partner than those who are in a committed relationship but are not living with their partner. A similar pattern is present among partnered social media users when they are asked about whether they have shared their login information for any of their social media accounts. There also are some differences by age. This survey conducted last fall also examined how social media might be affecting the way people think about their own love lives.

More specifically, does seeing relationship posts on social media affect the way people think about their own relationships? Overall, eight-in-ten social media users see others post about their relationship on social media often or sometimes. This differs by both age and gender. Overall, seeing these posts appears to have little effect on how people view their own romantic relationships.

These relationship-focused posts tend to have a bigger impact on women than men. About four-in-ten social media users who are either Hispanic or lesbian, gay or bisexual LGB say they have ever posted about their dating life or relationship on social media, while around one-quarter of white, black and straight social media users say the same. Younger social media users also are more likely to have posted about their love lives on social media previously.

While about half of social media users ages 18 to 29 have ever posted on social media about their dating life or relationship, a third of to year-olds say the same. Using social media to check up on former romantic partners is a fairly common practice among social media users. Social media users ages 18 to 49 are far more likely than those ages 50 and older to report using social media to check up on an ex-romantic partner. Seven-in-ten to year-olds report that they have used these platforms to check up on someone they used to date or be in a relationship with.

That share is lower — though still a majority — among users ages 30 to 49 and falls sharply among those ages and 50 and older. About two-thirds each of social media users who are cohabiting or in a committed relationship say they have used social media to check up on someone they used to date. But the level of importance that these users place on social media varies substantially by age.

The level of importance that partnered adults place on social media also varies by race and ethnicity as well as by sexual orientation. A friend of mine swears that the Outdoor Adventure Club is full of singles. Co-ed sports teams are also popular.

One of my friends met her long-term boyfriend in a kickball league. I played on a kickball team with my coworkers, and we were pretty antisocial with the other teams, which kept us from mingling with them after the games.

Recently, I was in line to buy a crepe in SoMa, when the guy working the food truck tried to upsell me on bananas. I considerately warned the cute guy behind me. I was about to head home with my crepe, when he started a flirty conversation with me.

This led to us going to the bar next to the food truck and then dancing all night. What I learned in this scenario is that crisis brings people together. This will definitely increase the likelihood of the cute person behind you asking you out on the spot. Everyone has a Muni crush, but rarely do you actually approach that cute boy or girl.

I have a friend who got asked out on a date on Muni, though. People, stop being afraid of asking someone out on Muni. All you have to do is compliment their outfit. As I talked to more friends about finding love IRL, my friend gave me the best advice: stop being the person who is always on her phone and who always has her headphones plugged in.

Read my work at www. Get started. Open in app. Sign in Get started. TBI's Awards. Get started Open in app. Yes, You Can Date without a Smartphone. Nicole Karlis. More from The Bold Italic Follow. Celebrating the free-wheeling spirit of the Bay Area.

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Sure, people do it — and succeed at it — all the time. A friend of mine wrote an article about this , explaining that she used to be embarrassed to admit that she met her boyfriend on Tinder. I have yet to hear about a friend who got asked out on a date after, say, bumping hands with the cute guy at Whole Foods who was reaching for the same avocado. Alcohol is usually always involved too.

Neither of them I met on a dating app. After I was assigned this story, I began a quest to gather information about how other people meet lovers without an app, outside of a bar and without an intro from a friend. As someone who once babysat dogs through DogVacay, I can actually attest to this. One time, when I was babysitting a cute Chihuahua mutt named Walter, I brought him to a Sunday-funday party.

Secretly, I was hoping it would keep me from drinking too much before Monday. Instead, he helped me do the exact opposite. My friend and I got asked to dinner by two attractive guys, and we ended up dancing at the Tonga Room like we were old couples on a cruise ship.

My friend then went on a couple of dates with one of the guys. Dogs are always good conversation starters. They also give us confidence when we talk to strangers. According to a study by Dognition, 82 percent of people would feel more confident talking to an attractive stranger if that person had a dog with them. A friend of mine swears that the Outdoor Adventure Club is full of singles. Co-ed sports teams are also popular.

One of my friends met her long-term boyfriend in a kickball league. I played on a kickball team with my coworkers, and we were pretty antisocial with the other teams, which kept us from mingling with them after the games. Recently, I was in line to buy a crepe in SoMa, when the guy working the food truck tried to upsell me on bananas.

I considerately warned the cute guy behind me. I was about to head home with my crepe, when he started a flirty conversation with me. This led to us going to the bar next to the food truck and then dancing all night. What I learned in this scenario is that crisis brings people together. This will definitely increase the likelihood of the cute person behind you asking you out on the spot.

You can also find the questions asked, and the answers the public provided in the topline. Amid growing debates about the impact of smartphones and social media on romantic relationships, a Pew Research Center survey conducted in October finds that many Americans encounter some tech-related struggles with their significant others. For instance, among partnered adults in the U. Partnered adults under the age of 50 are particularly likely to express the feeling that their partner is distracted by their phone, with those ages 30 to 49 most likely to report this.

However, there is widespread agreement among the public that digital snooping in couples is unacceptable. For many adults, social media plays a role in the way they navigate and share information about their romantic relationships. Moreover, social media has become a place where some users discuss relationships and investigate old ones.

But social media can also be a source of annoyance and conflict for some couples. Still, some users view these platforms as an important venue for showing love and affection. These are some of the main findings from a nationally representative survey of 4, U.

This reference guide explains each term. Women who are in a relationship are more likely than men to say their partner is often distracted by their phone while they are trying to hold a conversation, but this gender difference is most pronounced among younger adults. Americans — regardless of whether they are in a relationship — were asked in the survey about their views about some issues related to technology and relationships. Seven-in-ten U. Majorities across major demographic groups view these actions as unacceptable, but there are some Americans who are more accepting of this behavior than others.

These actions also vary by the type of relationship. However, this pattern is largely due age differences in relationship status, as twice as many adults under 50 live with a partner than do those 50 and older. There also are some differences by race and ethnicity. Overall, sharing passwords to digital devices or accounts is a fairly common practice in romantic relationships. Married or cohabiting adults are much more likely to share their cellphone or social media passwords with their partner than those who are in a committed relationship but are not living with their partner.

A similar pattern is present among partnered social media users when they are asked about whether they have shared their login information for any of their social media accounts. There also are some differences by age. This survey conducted last fall also examined how social media might be affecting the way people think about their own love lives.

More specifically, does seeing relationship posts on social media affect the way people think about their own relationships? Overall, eight-in-ten social media users see others post about their relationship on social media often or sometimes. This differs by both age and gender. Overall, seeing these posts appears to have little effect on how people view their own romantic relationships. These relationship-focused posts tend to have a bigger impact on women than men.

About four-in-ten social media users who are either Hispanic or lesbian, gay or bisexual LGB say they have ever posted about their dating life or relationship on social media, while around one-quarter of white, black and straight social media users say the same.

Younger social media users also are more likely to have posted about their love lives on social media previously. While about half of social media users ages 18 to 29 have ever posted on social media about their dating life or relationship, a third of to year-olds say the same. Using social media to check up on former romantic partners is a fairly common practice among social media users.

Social media users ages 18 to 49 are far more likely than those ages 50 and older to report using social media to check up on an ex-romantic partner.

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Przybylski got the inspiration for the study after noticing daters and bar-goers in Manhattan leaving their phones out on the bar or table. He wondered how the phone's presence might be influencing face-to-face interactions. He and his University of Essex colleague Netta Weinstein designed two simple experiments in which two strangers were told to talk for 10 minutes. In the first scenario, 74 undergraduates were paired up and asked to talk about an interesting event in the last month.

Some of them happened to have this conversation in a room with a mobile phone sitting unobtrusively on a nearby table. For others, the mobile phone was replaced by a black notebook. A second experiment used the same setup with 68 students.

This time, some of the students were told to have a casual conversation about how they felt about Christmas trees. Others were asked to discuss the most meaningful event of the year. For many adults, social media plays a role in the way they navigate and share information about their romantic relationships.

Moreover, social media has become a place where some users discuss relationships and investigate old ones. But social media can also be a source of annoyance and conflict for some couples. Still, some users view these platforms as an important venue for showing love and affection.

These are some of the main findings from a nationally representative survey of 4, U. This reference guide explains each term. Women who are in a relationship are more likely than men to say their partner is often distracted by their phone while they are trying to hold a conversation, but this gender difference is most pronounced among younger adults.

Americans — regardless of whether they are in a relationship — were asked in the survey about their views about some issues related to technology and relationships. Seven-in-ten U. Majorities across major demographic groups view these actions as unacceptable, but there are some Americans who are more accepting of this behavior than others. These actions also vary by the type of relationship.

However, this pattern is largely due age differences in relationship status, as twice as many adults under 50 live with a partner than do those 50 and older. There also are some differences by race and ethnicity. Overall, sharing passwords to digital devices or accounts is a fairly common practice in romantic relationships.

Married or cohabiting adults are much more likely to share their cellphone or social media passwords with their partner than those who are in a committed relationship but are not living with their partner. A similar pattern is present among partnered social media users when they are asked about whether they have shared their login information for any of their social media accounts. There also are some differences by age. This survey conducted last fall also examined how social media might be affecting the way people think about their own love lives.

More specifically, does seeing relationship posts on social media affect the way people think about their own relationships? Overall, eight-in-ten social media users see others post about their relationship on social media often or sometimes. This differs by both age and gender. Overall, seeing these posts appears to have little effect on how people view their own romantic relationships. These relationship-focused posts tend to have a bigger impact on women than men. About four-in-ten social media users who are either Hispanic or lesbian, gay or bisexual LGB say they have ever posted about their dating life or relationship on social media, while around one-quarter of white, black and straight social media users say the same.

Younger social media users also are more likely to have posted about their love lives on social media previously. While about half of social media users ages 18 to 29 have ever posted on social media about their dating life or relationship, a third of to year-olds say the same. Using social media to check up on former romantic partners is a fairly common practice among social media users. Social media users ages 18 to 49 are far more likely than those ages 50 and older to report using social media to check up on an ex-romantic partner.

Seven-in-ten to year-olds report that they have used these platforms to check up on someone they used to date or be in a relationship with. That share is lower — though still a majority — among users ages 30 to 49 and falls sharply among those ages and 50 and older. About two-thirds each of social media users who are cohabiting or in a committed relationship say they have used social media to check up on someone they used to date.

But the level of importance that these users place on social media varies substantially by age. The level of importance that partnered adults place on social media also varies by race and ethnicity as well as by sexual orientation.

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But while texting her "hello" may be less intimidating, that doesn't mean it's what women prefer. In today's techie world, texting is the typical approach in social circumstances but confidence is a trait that singles repeatedly prioritize. So stop being passive, pick up the phone and show genuine interest. If you had a great time, dropping your date a quick note to this effect is a nice touch. Not only does it make your feelings clear in a low-pressure way, but also it opens the door for more flirty conversation so you don't fall off your date's radar or vice versa.

But now, it's important to set your watch, too! If you don't, you could end up at the bottom of your date's virtual address book. If things didn't go well on your date, don't be shocked any longer if your heart is put on the line. More than 50 percent of singles would consider breaking up with someone they were casually dating with just a few swipes on screen. And 24 percent of people would even consider ending an exclusive relationship via text! Android: Is that a 4G in your pocket or are you just happy to see me?

Apparently, the device you carry speaks loudly even when your ringer is on silent. An iPhone or Android isn't just a tech choice, it can give dates insight into your personality and behaviors, too. The study found that Android users are the more polite eDaters--they're more likely to pick up a date at home, pay for the first date, eat at a nice restaurant and send a post-date text. And they're trusting of their partners, too. Nearly 50 percent of Android users would allow someone they are dating to look through their phone.

Be still, my mobile heart! Whatever device you tote, remember that tech is another tool to use in your eFlirt evolution. Texting mobile to mobile can bring you closer to heart to hearts the next time you meet. As your relationship develops, communicating via characters is inevitable and when done thoughtfully, can enhance your budding relationship.

She says that because text doesn't afford the level of intimacy that voice does, relationships can be ended much quicker. Palmer says men traditionally make the first move and women respond, which she says is "very difficult" for men. Men and women are adjusting to this new reality of dating in a mobile-dependent society. The rise of text in the world of dating is another indication of how much has changed in the way relationships develop.

Young adults are used to being overscheduled and multitasking. They've grown up with group activities and are more comfortable in packs. Experts say it should be no surprise they're treating their romantic relationships in much the same way — not wanting to invest too much time or effort in case they don't click.

Texting vs. First dates are largely a chemistry check anyway, and to many young adults, the one-on-one time spent on an actual date feels too much like a commitment. You don't know how it's going to go," says Adam Diamond, 29, a movie trailer editor in Los Angeles. Preschool teacher Rachel Goetz of Manhattan likes the flexibility a drink allows for both parties.

If I'm not interested, then I don't feel bad that the gentleman spent a lot of money on a dinner," says Goetz, Dean, a Millennial who writes about her generation — generally born to — says, "We really see this generation as having a huge handicap in communication. We have our heads down in our smartphones a lot.

We don't know how to express our emotions, and we tend to hide behind technology, computers and social media. A text message is easier. You can think exactly what you want to say and how to craft it. When they are face-to-face or over the phone, there's this awkwardness," she says.

It's kind of this in-between. And part of it is, it's a lot more work than a text. Millennials' love of texting is rubbing off on other generations, suggests Naomi Baron, a linguistics professor at American University in Washington who studies electronically mediated communication. She says telephone calls are often thought of as an intrusion, while texting affords a way of "controlling the volume," a term she uses to describe the sense of control that text gives users that they can't get with a voice conversation.

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